Posts Tagged ‘Treatment’

Diverticular Disease: The Fibre Story

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

In the early part of the 20th century constipation was not generally related to any individual illness. The idealised achievement of daily defaecation meant constipation was common particularly in the elderly. Treatment was not free until the NHS came along and natural and herbal laxatives were well used medications. Diverticular disease (DD) became recognised more before WW11. The distinguishing symptoms were pain, fever and diarrhoea. A low residue diet was recommended to reduce diarrhoea and give the bowel rest. Serious pain sometimes resulted in surgery. Infection and inflammation (diverticulitis) were not always present but pieces of food and faeces were trapped in diverticula. Avoidance of coarse fruit and vegetables, seeds and pips was recommended.

Hospital diet sheet for diverticulitis 1961………”forbidden foods – all fried foods, pips and skins of fruits, pastry, suet puddings, coarse stalky vegetables, salads, onions and celery, chunky marmalade, jam with pips or skins, wholemeal or brown bread, coarse biscuits-Ryvita, digestive, Allbran, oatmeal, Weetabix, Shredded Wheat, fruitcake or scones, nuts, dried fruit.”

A significant change in diet started about 1970 when treatment for diverticular disease (DD) was suddenly reversed.

Hospital diet sheet for diverticulis 1982………..”you can eat a normal varied diet but include…… (all of the forbidden foods from 1961 except fried food)….SUPPLEMENT meals with 2 teaspoonfuls of unprocessed bran twice daily. EAT LESS white flour in any form and white and other sugars. DIETARY FIBRE ….by helping to restore normal function of the digestive tract, fibre can be useful in the treatment of constipation and diarrhoea”

  • Who persuaded health professionals that wheat bran was good for diarrhoea?
  • What was the evidence for this complete reversal of treatment?
  • Did anyone ask patients if this helped them?
  • Who was behind this change?

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Diverticulitis: a wind of change

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

There have been many changes over the years in the approach to diverticular disease (DD), even in the names used. Diverticular disease is the overall name. The presence of the grape-like diverticula on the outside of the colon results in a diagnosis of diverticulosis. Diverticulitis occurs when there is infection and inflammation of the diverticula but is often used when there are any symptoms caused by the disease.

Diverticulosis can have episodes of diverticulitis or complicated diverticulitis when problems such as bleeding, abscess, fistula or blockage need surgical treatment. This is a simplistic explanation of what might happen in DD in decreasing numbers, so that only a small fraction of people with DD ever need surgery. Any progression in the disease can stop and revert to symptomless diverticulosis at any time, some people with diverticulosis do not even know that they have it.

There has been confusion over many years about the symptoms with DD. (more…)

Diverticular Disease in Healthcare Systems, part 2, community

Monday, December 6th, 2010

 The impact of diverticular disease (DD) in the hospital situation was discussed in the Winter 2006/2007 issue of the magazine. This area is well researched to update and optimise the diagnosis of DD and the expert treatment of complications on an individual basis. This research also shows that DD is an increasing burden on hospitals in terms of number of admissions and costs. Better management in the community is critical in reducing this burden. Prevention of complications of DD would benefit both NHS budgets and patients. (more…)

Diverticular Disease in Healthcare Systems, part 1 hospitals

Monday, December 6th, 2010

Diverticular disease (DD) is not the sort of complaint where a distinct diagnosis is obvious without investigation. Nor is there a well established treatment regime which prevents or slows down a foreseeable progression. DD is not predictable in its effects, it may or may not progress and there is no treatment which is universally successful. The place of DD in the healthcare system is not clear-cut. (more…)

Pain with diverticular disease

Thursday, September 9th, 2010

In 2001, 230 members of a previous organisation for DD sufferers (NADD) completed a questionnaire about their symptoms. The results are shown in Table 1. (more…)

All in a name – medical terms

Thursday, September 9th, 2010

 

Diverticular disease is an umbrella term which covers the physical changes in the colon wall and the effects from diagnosis to life-threatening complications and all the different symptoms which result from the disease. The muscular deformity with the characteristic bulging hernia or pouches called diverticula is known as diverticulosis. This definition is of a visible physical abnormality and does not indicate the extent of damage to the colon or describe its effects. Some people do not know that they have diverticulosis but after diagnosis about ¾ of patients have some type of symptoms. (more…)

Getting Personal With Diet

Friday, August 20th, 2010

When somebody is diagnosed with a disease, after months of symptoms and tests, they quite reasonably expect that a treatment is available for their condition. For example, inhalers for asthma, nitrates for angina, drugs to control Parkinson’s disease symptoms or vitamin C for scurvy. 30 years ago diverticular disease (DD), like scurvy, was considered a deficiency disease which could be prevented and treated by increasing the amount of fibre in the diet with wheat bran. Diet sheets and recipes were handed out and, with a few existing bowel drugs for symptoms, the disease was sorted out. Nothing could be done about the diverticula once they had been formed, so a high fibre diet was and often still is the treatment on offer.

     This is 2005, has anything changed since the 1970s? (more…)

What is Diverticular Disease

Thursday, August 5th, 2010

What is diverticular disease

 The large bowel becomes deformed in diverticular disease. The muscles appear to be permanently contracted so that the colon can be shortened and more corrugated. The bowel wall becomes ruptured particularly next to it’s blood vessels and pressure forces the inner layers to protrude through the wall to produce the characteristic grape-like pouches on the outside of the colon. There can be few of these pouches – called diverticula – or the whole colon can be affected. Similarly there can be a wide range of symptoms, but nobody knows how to stop the possible progression of the disease from symptomless, to a chronic, debilitating and recurring syndrome and on to life-threatening complications. Death rates in this country started at nil and have risen throughout the 20th century. With any other complaint, this statistic alone would prompt an outcry for research into causes, prevention and treatment. (more…)