Posts Tagged ‘Drugs’

Is diverticular disease making you housebound?

Monday, November 14th, 2011

THE PROBLEM

DD affects people in many different ways, some have few or no symptoms and their lifestyle is unaffected. Others are simply too ill to even think about leaving their home. These extremes can be a permanent or temporary situation for many sufferers. Older, retired people with DD sometimes have a different problem. An organiser of outings for an over-60s club said that people with DD could not go on their trips because they dare not go away from a toilet. That was 3 decades ago and not much has changed since then. Some coaches now have on-board toilets but public transport and car journeys also present problems. Apprehension and nervousness before a holiday, meal or outing, even a pleasurable one, sends their guts into overdrive. There is no mention of this problem in medical or self-help books or websites. It is not a topic of conversation even with close relatives and comedian’s jokes do not help. (more…)

RIFAXIMIN – a potential treatment for diverticular disease

Thursday, July 7th, 2011

 

Rifaximin is a synthetic antibiotic, a modification of rifamycin which was originally produced by the  microbe Streptomyces mediterranei. Rifaximin should not be confused with rifampicin which is used under brand names and in combined treatments particularly for Tuberculosis infections.

Rifaximin passes through the digestive system virtually unabsorbed and unchanged so retaining its antimicrobial activity and concentration level inside the colon. (more…)

Diverticular Disease in Healthcare Systems, part 2, community

Monday, December 6th, 2010

 The impact of diverticular disease (DD) in the hospital situation was discussed in the Winter 2006/2007 issue of the magazine. This area is well researched to update and optimise the diagnosis of DD and the expert treatment of complications on an individual basis. This research also shows that DD is an increasing burden on hospitals in terms of number of admissions and costs. Better management in the community is critical in reducing this burden. Prevention of complications of DD would benefit both NHS budgets and patients. (more…)