Archive for the ‘Associated illnesses’ Category

Diverticular Disease: Genetics and Collagen

Thursday, July 9th, 2015

Compared with other diseases, advancements in science and technology left diverticular disease (DD) behind decades ago. Worldwide occurrence, poor quality of life, level of mortality and healthcare costs should have generated far more research effort. Preoccupation with dietary fibre levels, constipation and ageing has and still is stunting research. Fibre levels have benefits for constipation and symptoms but research into cause, prevention and other treatments has been overtaken by the necessary investigations into the surgical rescue of DD effects. Recently valid trials and surveys have disputed traditional thinking about a dietary cause and revealed a genetic factor. (more…)

IBS, Smoking, E-cigarettes and Nicotine

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

IBS and other diseases of the digestive system, including diverticular disease, are affected by cigarette smoking. Tobacco smoking is rapidly being replaced by the use of e-cigarettes known as ‘vaping’. This system is clamed to be safer than tobacco cigarettes, giving the pleasurable effects of nicotine with only trivial side effects. However, the pharmacological effects of nicotine are still relevant to all nicotine delivery systems.

This article appeared in Gut Reaction, the magazine of the IBS Network, Issue 93, Oct 2014


IBS sufferers are well aware that diet and the passage of food residues through the gut can influence their problems. Similarly, worry and stress affect the digestive system through nerve connections between the head brain and gut brain. Less attention is paid to substances which reach the bowel through it’s blood supply to modify nerve and muscle behaviour. Drugs and their side-effects are an example.

Cigarette smoking delivers many chemicals into the blood stream (more…)

Diverticular Disease And Colon Cancer

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

Does having diverticular disease (DD) increase the risk of colon cancer (CC)?  One expert would say “yes” and another would answer “no”. Much depends on the design of studies, choice of patients, what data is fed into the computer for statistical analysis, interpretation of the results and what opinions and conclusions are made.

Research can be based on the occurrence of the two separate diseases, how many people with DD have CC and how many people with CC have DD (1). Comparison can be made with the levels of CC and DD which would be expected in the general population. Information can be expanded by including different types of cancerous lesions and their position in the colon. The diagnosis of DD is not so stable. Diverticulitis but not diverticulosis was indicated to be in a long-term causal relationship with increased risk of left-sided CC (2). However, these conditions at diagnosis can change. Diverticulitis can revert to diverticulosis with few further problems, or, diverticulosis can later progress to diverticulitis or even further to serious complications. This is a basic problem in DD research. (more…)

Overlapping illnesses

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

 

In his article ‘How what happens homes in on your gut’ (Gut Reaction Issue 65) Prof Read describes how illnesses tend to overlap. People with IBS are also 60% more likely to have migraine and depression (1) as well as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and functional dyspepsia which were mentioned. A link has also been demonstrated between IBS and overactive bladder (2). 

A common thread through these ‘unexplained illnesses’ is the role of serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine or 5HT. (more…)

Migraine, the gut and diverticular disease

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

MIGRAINE AND GUT MALFUNCTION

What has migraine got to do with diverticular disease?”

That was the occasional response when DD sufferers were asked in a survey if they or any blood relative have/did have migraine. However, 42% of females and 29% of males had migraine themselves or a blood relative did. Some noted that they ‘used to have’ migraine. These figures are far higher than the 10% or so incidence of migraine expected at retirement ages. A survey of migraine sufferers in Ireland found that 51% had also been diagnosed with IBS. A survey of people with IBS found a 60% greater prevalence of migraine than in non-IBS controls (1). There was a frequent association between headache, including migraine, and gastrointestinal symptoms (acid reflux, diarrhoea, constipation and nausea) in a Norwegian report (2).

Patients who did not respond to a high fibre diet, who had a single, intermittent abdominal pain were investigated in Leeds (3). Symptoms and family history suggested that 49% of them might have abdominal migraine and 32% of these had typical migraine symptoms during the attack. Mulak (4) noted that migraine and IBS often coexist. (more…)