Posts Tagged ‘Diagnosis’

Colon Wall Muscles in Diverticular Disease

Sunday, September 2nd, 2012

MUSCLE LAYERS

Between the mucus producing lining and the outer layer of the colon wall, there are two major muscle systems. The inner circular muscles surround the colon, contraction can close the colon or they can act in waves to propel contents along. Between the appendix at the beginning and the rectum at the end of the colon, longitudinal muscles are gathered into three bands known as taenia. This arrangement allows contractions to shorten the colon and propel faeces without compressing them. Coordination between the two types of muscle can produce a variety of movements. An earthworm moving along soil is a good example to observe a similar system.

MOVEMENTS ALONG THE COLON

In the caecum, repeated circular muscle contractions mix the liquid contents (chyme). These change into backwards and forwards segmenting and propulsive movements to dry and move the mushy contents along the ascending and transverse lengths of the colon. Longitudinal muscles become more involved as faeces become more solid in the second, left side, of the colon. Occasional powerful contractions sweep faeces into the descending and sigmoid areas. Faeces are stored with the sigmoid area acting as a vertical warehouse with supporting arcs of circular muscle. Strong contractions of longitudinal muscles produce a concertina effect to push out colon contents on defaecation. The first half of the colon is controlled automatically by the vagus nerve from the brain. The left side has some local nerve reflexes and a person can have some influence such as when to defaecate.

CHANGES WITH DIVERTICULAR DISEASE

Changes in the colon musculature in diverticular disease (DD) were described even before the early 20th century when DD was rare, (1) and in many reports since. Muscle abnormality and dysfunction persisted in the colon after resection of the areas with diverticula (2). Long sections of the left colon can change in appearance without any diverticula which may only occur years later. The muscular abnormalities are the primary pathogenic mechanisms of DD (3). DD is only diagnosed when diverticula are observed, changes in muscles have had little attention especially in areas without diverticula. (more…)

Is diverticular disease making you housebound?

Monday, November 14th, 2011

THE PROBLEM

DD affects people in many different ways, some have few or no symptoms and their lifestyle is unaffected. Others are simply too ill to even think about leaving their home. These extremes can be a permanent or temporary situation for many sufferers. Older, retired people with DD sometimes have a different problem. An organiser of outings for an over-60s club said that people with DD could not go on their trips because they dare not go away from a toilet. That was 3 decades ago and not much has changed since then. Some coaches now have on-board toilets but public transport and car journeys also present problems. Apprehension and nervousness before a holiday, meal or outing, even a pleasurable one, sends their guts into overdrive. There is no mention of this problem in medical or self-help books or websites. It is not a topic of conversation even with close relatives and comedian’s jokes do not help. (more…)

How many people have diverticular disease and symptoms

Wednesday, January 12th, 2011

Nearly every review of diverticular disease (DD) and some research papers begin with statistics about how many people have DD at different ages. Figures regularly quoted for Western countries are 5% of the population by the age of 40, 25% by the age of 60 and 65% at 85 years. Variations are also described such as 50% of the population over 60 years, or 1/3 to 1/2 of the population will get the disease. In England and Wales this works out at over 5 million people which would rise with the aging population.

Trying to find the sources of these figures (more…)

Diverticular Disease in Healthcare Systems, part 1 hospitals

Monday, December 6th, 2010

Diverticular disease (DD) is not the sort of complaint where a distinct diagnosis is obvious without investigation. Nor is there a well established treatment regime which prevents or slows down a foreseeable progression. DD is not predictable in its effects, it may or may not progress and there is no treatment which is universally successful. The place of DD in the healthcare system is not clear-cut. (more…)